Cool Road Adelaide

Two tradespeople applying a light gray paint product on a road surface.
Photo courtesy of City of Charles Sturt

Project Information

We are currently planning a Cool Road Adelaide project, a trial of three cool road surface products which reflect heat. The three products are CoolSeal by GuardTop as well as JetCool and JetBloc by Fulton Hogan. These are also road preservation products, used to lengthen the life span of a road and therefore increase the timespan between having to dig up and re-lay a road.

The Cool Road Adelaide project is a Climate KIC Australia project delivered in partnership with the City of Adelaide and South Australian Department for Environment and Water. The project is also made possible with in-kind support from Fulton Hogan.

The project involves applying the three cool road surface products (a fourth patch will be left as a control area) to Bowen Street West and measuring them for cooling benefits over summer 2019/2020. The road preservation qualities will be evaluated over the longer term.

The trial will include the collection of land surface temperature and ambient air temperature measurements before and after the products are applied. Research on one of the three products in another local Council area has found up to a 6.1oC cooling on the surface of the treated road.

We will collect the ambient air temperatures at different heights above the surfaces.

The data collected will be used to understand the benefits of these products for land surface temperature and air temperature. The project will provide evidence to support the City of Adelaide and other councils to make informed decisions about the application of cool road surface products across South Australia.

We will undertake pre-application surface temperature measuring in December 2019, application of cool road surface products in January 2020, and a community survey and post-application surface temperature measuring in February 2020.

Background

The urban heat island effect is an extensively documented climate phenomenon and is prevalent in many Australian cities. Concrete buildings and asphalt roads create heat islands that can be significantly hotter than temperatures in the surrounding suburban and rural areas. Because the number of extreme heat days is predicted to increase significantly over the next few decades, and the urban heat island effect has been shown to be exacerbated by climate change, the City of Adelaide is working to understand and reduce heat islands.

A Heat Mapping Tool is publicly available which assesses how all suburbs are affected on hot days and nights. The City of Adelaide is using this data to inform its planning and design, for example in tree planting and choice of materials in public spaces like playgrounds, parks and pavements. Residents and businesses can consult the tool to understand how heat exposed their property is.

You will find a graph in the image gallery that depicts the average land surface temperature for a range of different surfaces measured across the Heat Mapping study area. Bitumen is one of the consistently hot urban surfaces both day and night, covers a large part of our city, and is directly controlled by the City of Adelaide.

Photo courtesy of City of Charles Sturt

Project Information

We are currently planning a Cool Road Adelaide project, a trial of three cool road surface products which reflect heat. The three products are CoolSeal by GuardTop as well as JetCool and JetBloc by Fulton Hogan. These are also road preservation products, used to lengthen the life span of a road and therefore increase the timespan between having to dig up and re-lay a road.

The Cool Road Adelaide project is a Climate KIC Australia project delivered in partnership with the City of Adelaide and South Australian Department for Environment and Water. The project is also made possible with in-kind support from Fulton Hogan.

The project involves applying the three cool road surface products (a fourth patch will be left as a control area) to Bowen Street West and measuring them for cooling benefits over summer 2019/2020. The road preservation qualities will be evaluated over the longer term.

The trial will include the collection of land surface temperature and ambient air temperature measurements before and after the products are applied. Research on one of the three products in another local Council area has found up to a 6.1oC cooling on the surface of the treated road.

We will collect the ambient air temperatures at different heights above the surfaces.

The data collected will be used to understand the benefits of these products for land surface temperature and air temperature. The project will provide evidence to support the City of Adelaide and other councils to make informed decisions about the application of cool road surface products across South Australia.

We will undertake pre-application surface temperature measuring in December 2019, application of cool road surface products in January 2020, and a community survey and post-application surface temperature measuring in February 2020.

Background

The urban heat island effect is an extensively documented climate phenomenon and is prevalent in many Australian cities. Concrete buildings and asphalt roads create heat islands that can be significantly hotter than temperatures in the surrounding suburban and rural areas. Because the number of extreme heat days is predicted to increase significantly over the next few decades, and the urban heat island effect has been shown to be exacerbated by climate change, the City of Adelaide is working to understand and reduce heat islands.

A Heat Mapping Tool is publicly available which assesses how all suburbs are affected on hot days and nights. The City of Adelaide is using this data to inform its planning and design, for example in tree planting and choice of materials in public spaces like playgrounds, parks and pavements. Residents and businesses can consult the tool to understand how heat exposed their property is.

You will find a graph in the image gallery that depicts the average land surface temperature for a range of different surfaces measured across the Heat Mapping study area. Bitumen is one of the consistently hot urban surfaces both day and night, covers a large part of our city, and is directly controlled by the City of Adelaide.