What do you think of our Transport Map?

almost 4 years ago

Have we indentified the key elements of future transport correctly? What do you think of the expert ideas from Fred Hansen? View the Transport Map and then share your vies, ideas and comments with others in the discusion forum.

  • Andrew Schulz about 8 years ago
    The proposed City Loop Tram should run down North Terrace, Morphett, Gouger, Angus and Pulteney Streets. Other tram connections should be made to run along Melbourne Street, Currie/Grenfell Streets and Franklin/Flinders Streets.The proposed underground rail route should run in a more north/south direction rather than in an east-west direction. An alternative route should run from the Adelaide Railway Station, and navigate due south and run directly underneath Gawler Place, with the southern portal connecting to the Noarlunga/Tonsley line just before the convergence of the Belair rail line at Goodwood. Hindley Street and Rundle Streets need to become fully pedestrianised and converted into malls, or at the very least; a shared space - enforced only in the early hours of the morning - circa 2:00-7:00am for delivery trucks, goods and services suppliers to access.
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    • Phil from the NorthEast about 8 years ago
      That is better Andrew, yes. My chief complaint is around the fact that tram and underground train follow partly the same route via Victoria Square, (that's an expensive waste) then the train heads out west. Southern transport is problematic - and also when are we ever going to see some effective transport down around the South Tce precinct to develop that? Not in this design. Andrew, yours fixes that.I certainly support the Bus Prioirity Corridor route to the North East - as currently it takes as long to get from the City to the track as it does to then travel up it to Modbury - this should be rapid transit, otherwise we may as well drive to work. Not sure what a 'Priority Corridor' means though - what it should mean is 'buses only' or have one way traffic changing to the other direction in the mornings/afternoons like they do in Melbourne. Going underground would be better, but no doubt cost prohibitive.I think the southern suburbs definitely needs an O'Bahn service as well as the train - half hour train services are way too infrequent and unreliable - feel sorry for you guys. (As for Port Adelaide - why do they need Bus, Tram AND train?) Seems to be electoral motive here - spend the money on the South instead.I hope the pedestrian arrows mean either an overpass orunderpass across the transport corridors - the number of times you miss the bus or nearly get killed crossing Grenfell St, to get to the bus needs to be addressed. Finally, why not make the underground, also a bike route?
  • Twistie about 8 years ago
    In order to reduce the numbers of cars we need to create incentives to either leave them at home, or alternate locations to leave them. Car parking hubs close to the city, with cheap or free parking and transport to the city are an essential part of this. Parking at the entertainment centre and free tram transport is a good example of how to implement this. A poor example is the Klemzig oban interchange. There is insufficient parking at this location, and the bus fare is no cheaper. Just reducing the number of car parks or creating one way streets alone will only frustrate drivers.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Kel said about TransportPedestrian paths - BEST material is recycled rubber - GREAT under foot! And good lighting. And more dog-poo bags/ bins and water fountains en-route :)Trams - like the proposed link to North Adelaide : ) And, to the airport? (Would be good - such a nice way to introduce visitors to the delights of Adelaide - but a bit unclear from the info provided)?Car parking - more hubs just outside the city, with QUALITY, REGULAR, RELIABLE public transport and/or ACC push bikes available to get right into the city.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Kel said about TransportHmm ... not really enough info provided - my strongest thought here is to make it consistent. Not too many different things happening in too many different "latest and greatest" styles. For example, a city like Paris has a distinctive feel about it - everything is in keeping, beautifully crafted. QUALITY not quantity for Adelaide. All in good time. And keep PLENTY OF TREES AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT! Low density with fresh air and leafy shade - much better than an over-developed over-stimulating tacky metropolis. Quality, durability and timeless appeal : )
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    • copycat about 8 years ago
      Sorry Kel; I clicked the "disagree" button by mistake. I meant to click "Agree"! To take your argument further, Paris has banned 4WDs (SUV) from inner city & suburbs, and from all car parks. I think that would be a step in the right direction.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportIt would be great to have more cycling paths and in particular a connection between the Gaol Road crossing on Port Road (two way shared crossing) and the Bonython Park dedicated two way shared path, as this link is currently missing. Also a cycling path connection/crossing between North Terrace (under the bridge) and Montefiore Road heading towards Light Square. Thanks.
  • steve about 8 years ago
    Is it any wonder Australia ranks among the highest levels of car ownership in the world and we have motor traffic congestion problems in our cities when bicycle users get treated like criminals and denied the right to decide what to wear on their heads.Tell the Police to stop handing out helmet fines to people who want to use a bicycle without having to wear a helmet. The police force's helmet zealot revenue squad must stop harassing innocent students and visitors who ride without a helmet. Almost no other country has such extreme and repressive law's affecting the rights of bicycle users.http://helmetfreedom.org/847/bicycle-helmet-law-map/While I have not been fined recently having to spend 5 or 10 minutes explaining why i don't have a helmet on everytime they decide to pull me over is not fair and i have stopped riding again as a result. i avoid the city and buy everything i can off eBay instead.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_vehicles_per_capitaIf you want to do something to help pollution free safe transport users please "like"http://www.facebook.com/pages/Repeal-Mandatory-Bicycle-Helmet-Laws/299708740046667
  • adventure about 8 years ago
    Provision of bus priority lanes is a good idea as well as a proposed underground railway.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Trevor said about TransportThe Currie St/Grenfell St priority bus corridor cannot come too soon!
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportWill pedestrian streets be closed to cars, or else become one way streets? narrow two way streets are hazardous to pedestrians.Current Pedestrian use of areas are a poor indicators of need. Pedestrians are heavily discouraged by the current setup, and will surely increase with provision of safe walkways, together with encouraging publicity
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Margaret said about TransportIt is not clear what is meant by imporved pedestrian 'links'. Ideally I would like to see a lane or two, running from Grote Street near the Central Market, to Sturt Street, which are designated for pedestrians and bikes only. At present there is nowhere to safely cross Wright Street when walking to the market from Sturt St. It is only a matter of time before someone is seriously injured crossing Wright St. Although it is a narrow street drivers speed along it especially on market days. I have narrowly avoided being hit a few times and several of my neighbours with disabilities have an even greater problem. I hope this can be sorted out before 30 years go by!Anything that can be done to give pedestrians more priority is important to making Adelaide a better city. If you don't want to make streets pedestrian-only then at least bring back 'zebra crossings' like they have all over the world including in every major Australian city. These crossings give pedestrians the priority to cross roads and cars have to stop.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Sam said about TransportTram up O'Connell Street will link the city to a social, cultural, student hub and be a fantastic asset with re-developed Adelaide Oval
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Sam said about TransportCycling is about flow' and at the moment too many of bike lanes and paths do not connect up to each other or disappear altogether. Examples:-the bike path between Bonython Park & War Memorial Drive goes under the rail bridge on the North side & transforms into a dirt path into the golf course..- the bike path alongside Port Road does not connect into the city effectively (why is there no connection under the bridge near Gaol Road?)
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Sam said about TransportThe bike lane along Montefiore Road heading towards Light Square becomes quite dangerous as you head towards Hindley Street. - can a better entry point be designed for cyclists?
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Sam said about TransportThe Linear Park bike/walking path offers a great way to access the re-developed Adelaide Oval - has thought been given to how this asset will be managed during big events (eg AFL match days)?
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Jeremy said about TransportShared pedestrian zones should also be established in Melbourne Street and O'Connell Street - Divert traffic from Main North Road to east and west sides of City, not through O'Connell Street
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    • copycat about 8 years ago
      We also need to open either McKinnon Parade or Stanley Street to through traffic, so that pedestrians don't have to keep dodging cars in Melbourne St. It is disgraceful that the narrowest street of all those 3 parallel roads has been selected for cars & buses.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Jeremy said about TransportCycle paths are better away from major routes - Consider connecting the route that traverses Park 21 with Owen Street - Russell Street - Crompton Street - arriving at Central Market where there should be a large secure and free, for city workers, bike parking station.
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    • copycat about 8 years ago
      Pedestrians should not have to share cycle paths. Surely cycles can go on a separate route? What about the 2 footpaths that are on each side of most roads? One of them should become a cycle path. Cyclists need to learn to get off their bikes at intersections & wheel them across as pedestrians.
  • copycat about 8 years ago
    First, you need to get rid of buses. They are far too big for the city centre. Use them to get people from outer suburbs into a tram stop, say on West Tce or Dequetteville Tce. Then people transfer to frequent FREE trams. Secondly, your predecessor went to a lot of trouble to cause traffic snarls in Adelaide. My daughter suspects that that is because the ACC want to pretend that Adelaide is a big unmanageable city like New York or London. I think it is time to unblock the traffic & let it flow smoothly & fast. I would hate to drive an emergency vehicle in Adelaide.My suggestions:Get rid of those cement lumps that block most corners & put in lots of Turn Left slip lanes (the nightmare at Frome Road, as you leave North Tce, is an example: look at that hideous hot cement structure that is there instead of even a little garden. Most major roads in Adelaide can cope with 2 lanes of cars - through lanes, that is. Angus St, around Pulteney St, is a disaster with a turn right & a turn left lane. Through traffic should always have priority.
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    • Greywig about 8 years ago
      Sorry, have to disagree. If you make people get off a bus before they get to the city to change to a tram, they won't bother. It's not buses that are the problem in the CBD. The problem is that their way is blocked by so many cars. On King WIlliam Street and Grenfell Street, they are always blocked in the rush hours. There should be double-width bus lanes on both those streets.The slip-lane on the corner of Frome Road and North Terrace was removed on Jan Gehl's recommendation. They may be great fun when you're in a car but they are horrible and dangerous for pedestrians. Cars speed past inches away from you with the driver oblivious to your presence.Through traffic should definitely not have priority. The CBD is not a thoroughfare. That has been the problem to date.Sorry to be difficult but what you suggest is just more of what we have had for decades - a space that should be for people taken over by cars. That's changing finally and it is wonderful.
  • copycat about 8 years ago
    A bit more: In Paris 4WDs are banned from the city centre, and inner city suburbs, and from car parks. What about it?
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Lyn said about TransportI think it's short sighted to think that with a dramatic increase in activity and people, that there will be little need for vehicular traffic other than public transport. People will still need to travel into the city at night by car, whether it is to drop off / pick up kids from new artistic lessons, or collect friends and relatives from theatre events, etc. There will also be a high need for transit activity at night to restock shops etc.I think there should be a plan to convert some streets (perhaps the east - west ones north of Wakefield St) to one way traffic only - this would be more in line with other modern, large and vibrant big cities.Also, disappointed that a high speed rail network between the city and our international airport isn't in the plan. This has brought new life to some cities that have built one.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Hopper said about TransportWould rather see the underground rail link up with three of the four city squares than east tce. With access at all three squares.Obarn should run underground from Hackney rd then loop under cbd same as Brisbane and connect underground rail stns. May help with getting busses off Grenfell and Currie sts
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Vaaldir said about TransportPriority needs to given to safe bicycle pathways, not silly dual lanes where cars take 'right of way'.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Kent said about TransportWould love to have showers for cycling commuters in the city. Small businesses rarely have the facilities.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about Transportwould love a tram to go through the city and connect to the parade, henley beach road and occonel street.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about Transportclose rundle street to cars. make it a space for outdoor dining and buskers and pop-up retail and vendors all year around
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportExtend the tram from Nth Tce along West Terrace, and then up Currie St to Victoria Square. West Terrace needs a shake up.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Stephen said about TransportFully support across city seperated bike lanes, not entirely sure if Grote/Wakefiels is okay, concerned about bus volumes and traffic around market.What about Franklin/Flinders, no buses, some of Franklin already one lane?Suggest:Sir Donald Bradman, travelling to city, take Westside off road and through parklands to Franklin/West Tce intersection after Hilton Bridges crossed.Need lantern for bikes crossing West Tce to Franklin (only one side serviced at moment)Close off parts off Gray St, seems too popular with traffic.High volume of left hand tirns into Young St to car park, suggest removing Young/Waymouth traffic light..Allow greater time for cyclists crossing King William St, if crossing on orange light not enough time before KWS turns green.40 kph would be great, fully support..BTW Bike parking lacking courner of KWS and Currie St..Thank you
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    anonymous said about TransportHow come there is no bike lane on the picture of the Grenfell St upgrade. It seems to me a street where you propose more outdoor seating and cafe activity should not be a smelly bus corridor - unless the vision is for all buses to be electric (and quiet?) by then, Else, I'd never want to be seated near the road... A seperated bike lane would fit better, with a tram?Also, How will you tackle the traffic problem on the main S-N, W-E corridor streets if you take a lane away to fit a seperated bike lane?
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    John said about TransportPainted bicycle lanes for improved transport through the city
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportLooks pretty good. Movement around the areas is important. Moving footpaths/travelators?? in some areas would be worth a thought. Possibly separate paths where possible in garden areas from bike. Some people prefer "ambling" rather than setting a cracking pace through gardens. Seating areas should be scattered throughout tracks. Toilet facilties? Will take 30 years to get it right! Better to look this far ahead now.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    John said about TransportLove the slowed speed limits and shared pedestrian streets in high pedestrian areas!
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportNo Cars on Grenfell or Currie Street - Bus only between peak times
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Suzy said about TransportI am glad to see some cycle paths away from the traffic, but would like to see a lot more. The whole of North Terrace is an extremely useful route for cyclists but quite dangerous. It is a luxuriously wide boulevard so why not allow for cycling on the footpath, all the way? On the plan there is no provision for cyclists on North Terrace between King William Street and West Terrace. Why not? I use this road a lot as it is the most direct way to get to and from entertainment venues in the west end and in Mile End, Thebarton and Hindmarsh. I often ride illegally on the footpath as I feel much safer there than on the road with the traffic. I would not go out of my way to Wakefield Street for a safe bike path if heading to the west.. I would only use that to go to the market or maybe if I'm heading over to Goodwood direction. I think that was part of the failure of the Sturt Street bike path. It was not a street many cyclists use. Cyclists are like birds - we go direct, taking the shortest distance. It would be good if it were legal for cyclists to ride down Rundle Mall after the shops have shut, as it's safe there too. I use the linear park path in the daytime but not as a lone female cyclist at night, when I feel vulnerable. I would use the linear park more if there were more direct paths up through to the city. The access is quite limited at the moment.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Nick said about TransportTrams:I was initially not that positive regarding the State Govt's development of the KW Tram extension. All things considered I think it is a positive first step but a loop needs to be added and the line extended to O'Connell St to outweigh the (relative minor) hindrances it has so far brought about.Cycling, Pedestrians, Buses:Generally agree with the suggestions made.Shared Streets,Slow speeds are a good idea but think the lower speed may as we,ll be implemented throughout the Square Mile. (Awareness by pedestrians needs to increase as well, re J-walking, trams, semi pedestrian crossings)Park Lands:The majority of the Park Lands are under utilised. Any increased use of all the Park Lands is a positive that will give the ACC more reason to provide further funding for the maintenance and upkeep. This will hopefully result in a positive feedback loop and bring about further uses.
  • Greywig about 8 years ago
    I'm very pleased we're finally going to see separated bike lanes on key north-south and east-west routes. Please give serious consideration to the design of them though. They should be wide and on each side of the road. Do no copy Sydney's far too narrow bi-directional paths. Much simpler and cheaper is the Danish style raised lane each side of the road - like figures 12 and 13 on page 12 of the 'Sharing Street Space' Discussion Paper.
  • LukeP about 8 years ago
    The picture adelaide process should try in with the 5000+ process run by the State Government Integrated Design Commission. Much of what is being discussed here has been highlighted through that process and it would be a shame if these were not better integrated. There are some useful suggestions about transport including this one, which may warrant consideration. http://5000plus.net.au/ideas/180
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Benj said about TransportAny improvement to cyclist infrastructure is welcome in my books!
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    TRACY said about TransportA focus on cycling accessibility both on and off road is appreciated. I am always amazed at the increasing numbers of cyclists of all descriptions and ages from young children upwards I see using the bike lanes and trails in the city and parklands on a regular basis. I see many parents and young children regularly commute from the western fringe and parklands to school in the city by bike which is great.. any improvement in signage re bike paths and connnections would be appreciated. In relation to active transport I would encourage strategies that make multi mode active transport possible such as bike cariires on the front of buses (as I saw recently in Canberra as a standard on their public bus system). Maybe as a start the council could include this on their city bus circuit and advocate for catering for cyclist on all trams, trains and buses? I would llike some attention given to the South West corner of the West Tce and Sir Donald Bradman Drive intersection which is a issue for cyclists using the bike path and travelling either North or South. The cars that are travelling North and turning left from West Tce to Donald Bradman dont see the cyclists crossing on the pedestian crossing at the intersection coming either way. This may be that the cars that are turning left on to Donald Bradman dont see cyclists because they were second or later in the queue and the fist car went straight ahead, and the cyclists may not see that the car is turning until the last minute also. This isnt an issue on the North Western corner of the intersection because the cars travelling toward the city from Donald Bradman and then turning left onto West Tce have a separate turning lane and light sequence that caters for the cyclists. It is a siimilar situation on the West Tce / Henley Beach Road North and South West intersections, but I haven't had or seen near misses here that I have at the other intersection. Another issue for cyclists is the amount of broken glass on the Henley Beach Rd and North Tce to Port Road bike path sections. This always seems worse after the weekend and a regular sweep of these sections would encourage more cyclists, as there would be less chance of flat tyres from glass which makes riding less enjoyable. A permanent criterium circuit in Vic Park is also required. There has been hundreds of junior and senior cyclists enjoying this circuit and being active in the parklands whenever this has been available. The other users of Vic Park have become used to sharing the facility with the cyclist and are very interested in the activity taking place. Many people have come to watch and lots of juniours have felt safe to try criterium racing for the first time on this great off street circuit. Unfortunately access has been spasmodic and needs to be addressed. The city bikes loan scheme needs to be continued and expanded, and I am laways pleased to see these bikes in various locations both within the city and at destinations such as Glenelg, and Mount Lofty. It is a fantastic way for visitors and locals to access and enjoy Adelaide, and may enocurage residents to ourchase their own bikes in the future.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Meredith said about TransportI have a bike which I hardly ever use, not because I dont want to. Adelaide is simply just too unsafe in the areas that I need to go. You would have to be a blind optimist to think that bike riding is safe in Adelaide at present. Hopefully you can come up with something safer.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Rowan said about TransportI approve of the increased presence of bicycling and public transport features - this I think should be a priority of Adelaide if it is to become a world-class cosmopolitan city. However I am concerned that the cycling features are part of a 30 year plan and that a solution for north-south cycling must be provided much sooner. My primary concern is that there is no element of the plan which deals specifically with the impact of cars on the city. For example, there is currently an explosion of infrastructure for cars, such as car parking facilities. I believe there must also be plans to redirect investment now to ensure that the city doesn't completely form around cars. If this happens, there will be great political and social resistance to transition to a cleaner, more efficient transport system.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Christine said about TransportIt is great that there is a commitment to more and better bike paths. However, don't forget some bike racks in key desitinations as well. I recently rode my bike to the Central Markets and there were only a couple of racks which were taken and absolutely no-where else to put my bike.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    User said about TransportThe intersection of Franklin St and West Terrace is dangerous for bicycle riders and pedestrians. People in cars often fail to obey the red arrow when the green man is activated.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Martin said about Transport FutureWider and safer bike lanes - with priority given at intersections. Paint all the lanes green and widen them so there is more magain for error. opening car doors, vehicles reversing out of angle parks, pedestrians walking onto the street without looking all present dangers to cyclists! Also, wider footpaths for pedestrians and signal priority over cars! Lights are never green for long enough to walk over intersections without drivers cutting you off or behaving agressively! Make travelling through the city as hard as possible for drivers not using the city., More shared use streets to calm traffic!
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Jackie said about TransportPlease can we have not just 'improved links' but also that pedestrians and bikes have priority. At the moment you can die waiting for the lights to change then when they do many of the pedestrian signals go immediately red and then to top it off we are fining people for jaywalking. Is this really a worthwhile public health measure or revenue raising?? If you walk into town it can add a considerable amount of time to the journey and if you want to walk across from one park section to another this can be quite difficult with the stream of traffic in the rush hour. More malls would be good, Rundle street where the cafes are should be a mall. Cheaper bus fares with more regular services and better bike lanes and safer parking for bikes please. I gave up riding because my bike was vandalised and pieces stolen. We could make Adelaide a really pleasant place to live and visit.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Chloe said about TransportWhile prioritising public transport, cyclists and pedestrians over cars in the city makes good sense there is a need to consider how the city facilitates and accommodates for other green forms transport. I have had a scooter for 1 year and have seen an increasing level of competition for scooter/motorcycle carparks in the city. I would like to see more free motorcycle parks throughout the CBD that are in better protected and well signed areas.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Eric said about TransportMy idea is for Adelaide Metro to initiate a smart phone application that allows users to quickly locate public transport services with other real-time features. Because many people already have smart phones or other similar devices, such an application would be ideal for facilitating improved uptake of public transport for those who often are frustrated waiting for buses and trains. For those without such a device, the application could of course also include simpler SMS options, free phone helpdesk and a website. The public transport services in cities (and perhaps also linked nationally and even internationally) would need to provide some sort of GPS tracking so that people can call up a map of their area on their smart phone application and see what service is closest to them and which one will get them where they want to go most quickly/easily. I'm sure the number of people using public transport in Adelaide would dramatically increase if it were easier to quickly find the most convenient service operating at any time, anywhere. The application could also allow users to find out more info, such as accessibility (for disabled people, or cyclists – e.g. is there bike carrying space?), fares for different services, carrying capacity of the service (and current number of travellers on the service – with instant notifications when it is full) links to schedules, regular updates if a service is not operating or running slowly for whatever reason, etc. A.C.C. could perhaps spearhead this innovation and show its leadership in making it easier for suburban residents to get in and out of the CBD. This sort of thing is already happening in Melbourne with the 'Metlink SMS service for real-time information - http://www.metlinkmelbourne.com.au/using-public-transport/sms-services - and it is free! Why not build on this concept and make Adelaide a world leader in convenient public transport options?
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Phil said about TransportUniSA supports making Hindley Street pedestrian friendly and this is reflected in our City West Campus Master Plan refer http://www.unisa.edu.au/facilities/capital/campus_master_plans.asp
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    James said about TransportSome great ideas shown. To refine it I think you need more off street bicycle lanes, particularly ones that feed cyclists into the city from all directions not just the immediate North, South, East, West as shown. I also think any future tram line to the eastern suburbs should go down the northern side of Bartels Rd and out through Norwood Parade, not Wakefield St as shown. Norwood Parade is a vibrant shopping and dining area and a tram there would have a greater patronage and link vibrant parts of our city in a much better way than a tram running down Wakefield St and Kensington Road. Consideration should also be given to running tram tracks along roads that are used for motor racing and have been for 30 years. Motor racing is an important event for Adelaide and it would be a shame if it could not continue to use the current circuit due to tram tracks.
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    RF said about Transportfolks the various transport plans look exciting, as does the whole multi-faceted vision it does not deal with the big unknown however, which is the overall traffic plan for the city. I realise this is beyond the provenance of the city council largely, but until that is dealt with the benefit of many of these initiatives are going to be weakened RF
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Lee said about TransportExcellent ideas, I would add no cars in the city. Only alternative powered mass transport. Cars can stay outside the city ring and use free city transport, bikes, walking etc. Another free connector bus would be good. In the meantime slow down the speed in the city, make better bike lanes, green lights automated for pedestrians without having to click on them to cross a street. Make the city people friendly and not car friendly. A city is supposed to be design for people, and make it safe, easy and convenient to get around. cars do not give the right away and drive too fast as well as pollute and contaminate our environment.
  • Dantastique about 8 years ago
    The plan remains focused on the northern half of the city, why not plan on using the southern half too?Pedestrian and bike access is great, we need as much as possible, providing there's good visual surveillance and lighting. I love the mall at the moment now that the old Harris Scarf site has been cleared - it feels so much nicer, if only there was a public square there.Public transport links are paramount: easy interchange between airport, tram, train (domestic and interstate) and bus.It doesn't matter how good the connections are though, public transport has to be REGULAR so that it's at least as convenient as the car (nothing worse than waiting an hour for a bus).I think the trams are great, perhaps a tram city loop, again this could extend south of Wakefield street
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Martin said about TransportI believe Public transport is a way of the future, but adelaide needs to remember we are a smaller city on the scale of things and only have an allocated amount of money to fund major projects. I would like to give some suggestions on saving money and improving our transport / city projects. I believe the Adelaide Main Railway Station should be situated at Mile End.This will allow the rail network to have its through service for north / sound bound trains.it allows easy access to the interstate rail terminal.A New Tram service to travel from the adelaide airport, via sir don bradman drive, picking up train passengers and feeding them via the tram route, grote st, wakefield st, fromt st, north tce. passengers can also catch buses that traverse via Sir Don Bradman Drive.this would save a lot of money and keep the city a clean green public transport city
  • Picture Adelaide Comment about 8 years ago
    Peter said about TransportGood, but ensure vehicles cannot access Park Lands at bike/pedestrian ramps by use of mid-path bollards or handrails.